Flooring Installation and Cost Guides

Replacing old flooring is an essential part of any remodeling job, and your options for any room in the house are broad and diverse. So are the prices of the many flooring products available, ranging in cost from $3-$15 per square foot. The type of flooring you select will have an impact on your home remodeling costs. In this Remodeling Cost Guide, you’ll find useful information about the types of flooring available as well as an idea of your prices will be for the most popular kinds of flooring.

Types of Flooring and Their Costs

There are flooring types to fit any style you are creating in your home. They come in a range of costs too, so you should be able to find quality, attractive flooring that will fit your budget for your living room, den, home office, kitchen, bathroom or dining room remodeling costs. Here’s a look.

Carpet: This traditional flooring material is very versatile, with options in all colors and many different lengths and styles. While it’s not the best flooring for bathroom and kitchen remodels, it continues to be popular for many areas of the home. Most carpeting costs are $4-$6 per square foot.

Vinyl and Linoleum: As with carpet, these materials give you plenty of choice in color, pattern and style. They are easy to care for and fairly inexpensive to install. Linoleum and vinyl are quite affordable too, with prices from $3-$6 per square foot for the material.

Tile: This is still a popular material for kitchens, bathrooms, entryways and any other common areas of the house where floors get wet. Tile is rated by hardness and some of it has a bit of grit in the finish to make it less slippery. It comes is a diverse array of sizes, shapes and colors to fit any motif. Expect to pay $2-$5 per square foot for the material.

Hardwood and Pine: Wood flooring is a versatile flooring that looks good in traditional homes as well as contemporary. Most wood flooring costs $4-$8 per square foot of material.

Laminate: For those who want a floor with the look of wood, but one that requires less maintenance and is harder than most woods, laminate is a very good choice. It often costs less to install than wood does too. For costs, expect to pay $3-$6 per square foot of laminate.

Concrete: It’s not just for basement and garage remodeling anymore! With newer techniques such as tinting, stamping and acid staining, beautiful floors can be the result. Some have the look of natural stone such as granite. And they are durable floors. You’ll pay $5-$7 per square foot for the material. The cost of finishing the concrete with acid staining or other technique is significantly more.

Teak and Bamboo: These specialty woods are gaining in popularity because they are a sustainable product, much more so than standard hardwoods. They can be attractive too, especially teak. The price is slightly higher than pine or hardwood. You’ll find teak and bamboo for $6-$12 per square foot.

Terrazzo: This type of flooring is produced by embedding chips of tile, stone, marble, quartz, glass or other suitable material in cement. It’s as old as the Roman Empire yet a very fresh look today as well. Terrazzo flooring is labor-intensive, but the material costs are $4-$8 per square foot.

Stone Flooring: There are several types of natural stone used in flooring, with granite the most popular. It’s pricey for sure, but exceptionally beautiful. For the material costs, expect to pay $8-$12 per square foot.

DIY Installation of Flooring or Hire a Pro?

If you’ve got good skills, some type of flooring might be within your range to install, and you should consider it. Doing it yourself will cut your home remodeling costs significantly. But make sure you know what you’re doing, because most flooring types are pretty unforgiving. Mistakes are difficult and often expensive to fix.

There are certain types of flooring that are always best left to a professional. They include any type of stone flooring or that which uses concrete. Tile flooring is another tough one, and it makes sense to leave it to the people who do it every day.

For almost all types of flooring, the installation costs are much less than the material costs. The exceptions like concrete and tile are probably types you don’t want to tackle yourself anyway. No matter what you’re having installed, getting a few free, no-obligation estimates for professional installation will allow you to factor the prices into your kitchen, bathroom or living room remodeling costs, etc. Getting several written quotes will allow you to evaluate the flooring contractors to determine which one you believe will do the best job.

Comments

One Response to “Flooring Installation and Cost Guides”
  1. Daniel says:

    I am a kitchen desinger. I have customers that have concrete Floors. The objection to a floating floor is the hollow sound that is created from the floating floor. Does this product eliminate that issue? Also, With floating floors in the past we have installed the floor after the kitchen installation to allow the floor to move,. With this Product is that type of installation recommended or could this be installed previous to cabinet installation. Mainly the island.ThanksMark MutzKitchen Concepts and Design.

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